Thundereggs

The Portland Regional Show was a winner!

Posted on Updated on

The front entrance to this old timey rock show
An entry worthy of a rock show with a long history, sign should say ‘Rockhound Country’

This show featuring primarily agate, jasper and thundereggs had the Oregon stamp of true Agateers: the dealers, customers and rock club memebers were real rockhounds. Events like this will pass on the rockhound heritage for many years to come. The show ran from Friday, October 13th to Sunday, fortunately for me 13 has turned out to be my lucky number.  Here is a view of the large interior the morning of setup day.

I spent the last five months in Oregon and met many fine Oregon agateers.
Here I am with Michael Murphy, a very expert collector.

Among the rockhounds I have known for many years is Joe VanCura. This summer he welcomed me to his home and he has the most amazing collection of thundereggs I’ve ever seen. He is also an outstanding lapidary and has been mining thundereggs for a very long time (for one so young :>)

All in all it has been a rockhounding experience to remember. I hope to go to the Niederworresbach show near Idar-Oberstein, Germany, in March. When I return, if the creek don’t rise, I will return for another five months in North Plains outside of Portland,  Command Central of the Rockhound Universe :>)

A Big Rock Show in Portland October 13 – 15th

Posted on

On Friday the 13th of this month the doors will open for the Portland Regional Rock and Mineral Show and some people say it’s the best yearly all agate and jasper show in the US. I’ve never been to this show before but I’ll post a report when it’s over.

I’ve been spending this summer west of Portland in Hillsboro which is where the show will take place. I was very happy to be included as a dealer and I’ve gotten some very nice pieces to add to my already large inventory. I went over to Denver and got fine Condors from Ana de los Santos and Mark Boche, the first really fine Polyhedroid I’ve seen for a long time and some nice Mexican and Moroccan agates… oh, on and on!

These are just a few of my striking new offerings, I hope you can join me.

Cheers,
Thom

The 2016 Agate EXPO in Wisconsin This Past July

Posted on Updated on

Here are a few photos of good friends at the 2016 EXPO, it was the best agate show of all times.

Back in my booth I'm with my new friend Chuck Mosher - Thom Lane
In the back of my booth with a new friend Chuck Mosher

Other good friends I saw were Jeffery Anderson, Veronica Woods, Uwe Reir, Holger Quelmaltz, Hannes Holzmann, Alan Meltzer, Pat McMahan, Eugene and Brent Stewart, Ana de los Santos, Joshua Ritter, Roger Clark, Lorie Peterson and Steve Wheeler to name just a few.

Most photos by my famous sidekick, Norman Eberhardt.

I must mention that Dr. Goetze was kind enough to allow me to make a selection of my favorite thundereggs from his outstanding exhibition of the agates of Saxony. I also obtained some fine Moroccan agates from Joshua Ritter and many other fine pieces which will be appearing in my stores.

Thom’s talk at the 2016 Agate EXPO About The Baker Mine and Thunderegg Genesis

Posted on Updated on

I had the priveledge of giving a talk on the Baker Ranch thunderegg deposit and the genesis of thundereggs at the EXPO Symposium on July 7th, 2016.

The presenters of this symposium, The Gem Shop, videotaped the proceedings and with careful editing produced a wonderful set of four DVD’s. This handsome set contains all twelve  presentations by many major figures in the agate world, a bargain for 99$! Find out all about it and order a copy for yourself at The Gem Shop.

Slab Collecting is a Great Opportunity for Collectors Today

Posted on Updated on

In the early days of rockhounding in America it seemed like there was an endless abundance of wonderful agates and jaspers. The hobby of making cabochons grew so large that it was second only to woodworking as the most popular hobby in the US. During that time the great agate discoveries were exploited freely and many were quickly exhausted. Beautiful material was usually cut into slabs and the slabs were used to produce cabochons. It is still possible to find slabs that were set aside by collectors or were never cut into cabochons but it was uncommon to cut a rock in  half and polish the face. Toward the end of that period I was making my living cutting cabochons but I was also a collector and a painter and when I saw a slab that was highly artistic I rarely cut it into cabs, it went into my slab collection.

Morrisonite, the king of Jaspers - Thom Lane
Morrisonite Jasper Slab

Those who wish to collect the fine early materials should recognize that for the moment it is still possible to collect fine slabs and they offer many advantages to a collector. They are easy to store and display and they are reasonably priced given their rarity and beauty. Slabs and half nodule specimens can be combined in a display with the heavier specimens in the foreground and slabs mounted on stands above and behind them.

A few dealers at today’s rock shows still offer fine polished slabs of the rare early materials but it is not often that one sees a specimen of great beauty that is a saw cut rock with a polished face.

Precision polishing of a flat surface requires special equipment and knowledge and that may have further lessened the interest in flat lapping during the cabochon era.

What Makes Some Rock Specimens So Expensive?

Posted on Updated on

A big factor in the value of an agate, jaspers, and thundereggs is fashion.

Between 1950 and 1980 there was such an abundance of fine agate coming out of the ground in the US and Mexico that the supply seemed endless. People made a hobby of digging up agates or getting them at shows or at the hundreds of rock shops all over the country. Slabs of this material were used to create cabochons that were worth ten or twenty dollars which was a good profit from a top quality slab or a pound of Laguna rough, either of which might cost less than $5! A half nodule of beautiful agate had little value so good rough was usually cut into slabs. Now, cabs are almost worthless because of mass manufacturing, mostly in the Orient, and half nodules have become very expensive, so this represents a great change in taste and value. The large quantity of slabs left over from the earlier days are inexpensive in comparison to the value half nodules.

If you consider the agates from antiquity very few had flat surfaces. Modern lapidary equipment makes it possible to flat lap an agate so that the pattern in the stone is presented as if looking at a painting and that is now the style. In earlier times a domed surface was considered more desirable because the cutter could bring out the pattern and remove blemishes and thus create a piece that would be seen as the art of the lapidary. Sawing a rock in half and polishing the surface is a craft that requires great skill but little art. Agates that are cut according to the current taste have greater value, at least for the moment.

I cut the specimen below from a chip I picked up while I was working at the Morrisonite deposit. It had damage around the edge and the piece was thin. By doming it I was able to remove the damage and also save the pattern. The price would go up if it had the same pattern with a flat surface.

Morrisonite Jasper mined and dome cut by Thom Lane, The Agate Trader
Morrisonite Jasper mined and dome cut by Thom Lane, The Agate Trader

Another factor that affects price is the condition of the specimen itself. If the face of the agate has a crack, even a tiny one, or a chip on the edge or even a flake off the back the value of the specimen is less. Even minor flaws in the condition of the agate will affect the price. Other factors are the size of the piece and how it sits. A specimen that has to have an elaborate support is less desirable. A small specimen is difficult to appreciate but a large piece shows off the details of its pattern, size does matter. A specimen which has little contrast and is dark is rarely as valuable as an agate which has striking colors and pattern.

There are factors that depend on the life the agate has led such as having been in a famous collection or played a role in history. Some collectors desire specimens which have been featured in publications or major exhibits.

As everyone knows, from a dealer on the street to a graduate from the Harvard Business School, the main factor is supply and demand. If a material floods the market prices will drop and rarity will usually enhances value. Since agates are a surface phenomenon once a good deposit is located it is usually not long before it is worked out. Of course if social or political forces stop production or the source is very large and widely distributed it may be around for a long time. When a type of agate rough is no longer coming to market the price is sure to shoot up.

As with paintings aesthetics are very important. If viewers are struck by the art, the beauty and the elegance of an agate it can bring a fantastic price… the value of an agate is whatever buyers are willing to pay in order to add it to their collection and most collectors are very sensitive to beauty.

The agate below is very valuable because it is at the top of all the above criteria, you can go down the list and each criteria has been met in spades.

Circle Triangle Laguna, Gorn's Rock shop, El Paso - Thom Lane
Circle Triangle Laguna, Gorn’s Rock shop, El Paso. Texas. around 1960- Thom Lane

I look forward to hearing your comments on this topic, as a dealer I don’t set the prices, ultimately you decide.