morrisonite

Picture Jaspers added to The Cabochon Store

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Fellow agateers,

I added two large offerings of Hans Gamma’s wonderful picture jasper cabs to The Cabochon Shop this May. Many of the cabochons are from rare jaspers and they are all identified. You can see pictures of all these varieties in Hans Gamma’s new book: Picture Jaspers of the Northwest. You can get a copy from Hans by visiting his website worldofjaspers.com.

I also posted eighteen Willow Creek jasper cabs in The Cabochon Shop. I cut them from an exceptional area in the deposit which was quickly exhausted. I liked it because the black strokes in the pale grey and tan backgrounds reminded me of the Sumi paintings made by Japanese Zen monks.

Now I’m settled in Oregon, my ETSY stores are open for business and new postings will be announced soon. Have a great summer,

                                           Thom

A pillow cut cabochon
Owyhee Picture Jasper cut by Hans Gamma
large oval
a scenic desert beauty by Hans Gamma
Willow Creek Jasper Cab
Willow Creek cut by Thom Lane

A photo journal of mining at the Morrisonite Mine: 1994 – 1996

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Morrisonite is considered the King of Jaspers. I fell in love with it when I began cutting cabochons which are like miniature paintings. I felt that the images I could create with Morrisonite were the ones that really made it and I began my quest.

I met Darell Jakobitz, AKA Jake, in the late 1970’s. He sold at the 4th of July show in Madras, Oregon in the summer and once again at the PowWow in Quartzsite during the winter. On those occasions he had unbelievable slabs and many of the ones I bought went into my collection. An entire slab can equal the finest paintings in the world. In the 1980’s Gene Mueller became the principal miner and I went to Cedarburg to buy Morrisonite from him. With his permission I visited the mine in 1994 for a week with my son Miles and saw the mine for the first time. Several photos in Agates II are from Miles collection.

My first visit to the mine was in 1994

When Gene, my son Miles Lane and I arrived at the top rim of the Owyhee River Canyon Gene pointed out the road to the mining claims which goes across the hill and down the canyon wall beyond. From where we were the road dropped down very steeply to the visible area below but the next morning we went to the far side of the hill and down the side of the canyon, that’s when we really hung on for dear life. The dot in the center of the photo is the cabin on the right. It was built by the late Tom Caldwell, the first resident Morrisonite miner.

Gene and I began to talk about geology as the sun rose on the first day, a conversation that went on for years. The time I spent with Gene was a great learning experience. During our visit there Jake and Gene were working together at the area Gene eventually claimed under the name ‘Jake’s Place. As you can see in the photo of Gene tamping the nitro into a six foot drill hole this is indeed hard rock mining.

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In 1995 I participating in the mining for a month

I volunteered to help and my reward was being able to buy freshly mined morrisonite at the end of the operations. I didn’t buy much because I was cutting cabs, I wish I had a time machine so I could go back for more!

Gene used an old loader to complete a treacherous road down to his new mining spot, the Christine Marie claim far below Jake’s Place. The loader was also used to remove the muck or waste after an area had been blasted and the jasper had been carefully mined out by hand.

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The host rock at the CM Claim is broken up by nature which meant that it could be worked without explosives. We broke out the jasper by hand and Gene removed the muck with the old front end loader, shown above.

The host rock at the Christine Marie mine, above, has been shattered by forces in the earth long ago. The brown junky Morrisonite in the photo on the right was fairly abundant in certain areas and I include the photo because it shows how the jasper occurs in the rock. When it comes to gem jasper Gene said you get about a pound of Morrisonite per ton of rock.

The year before Miles and I had slept in a cabin up above so I just brought along a sleeping bag. When I asked Gene where I could sleep he said “anywhere you like”. Since there was no place for me in his cabin I tried to sleep on the ground but after about ten minuted I had rats in my face. The only way I could get off the ground was to sleep for the whole month in the five foot bed of the Ford Scout. It had front and rear positraction and was ideal for going up and down Gene’s road and  I was always so exhausted that I slept fine. Gradually I began to fit in.

Here are some photos of Gene’s cabin which he built against a large boulder from mostly found materials at a cost of 37$.

Jake (right) was working above and came down for a visit. Inside Gene’s hut was the kitchen and across from it his sleeping loft and not much else.

After about a week working in the CM Mine Gene took me further down the road to where there was a large compressor. It was parked a hundred yards or so to the south of his cabin, the compressor was just around the corner in this view of the road from Gene’s cabin. The post sticking out above the road is one of the roof poles of the cabin.

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From the compressor we headed up a scree slope and reached the Lower Cliff Dig up a ravine in the canyon wall to the left. The hose from the compressor was dragged up to the dig to run the drill from the compressor. To mine there you had to bring everything we needed for a day’s mining up the scree slope and every bit of Morrisonite was carried down in five gallon buckets. Tough work if you can get it.

In the photo on the left which was taken from about half way to the dig you can just make out the twelve foot long yellow compressor behind the long boulder on the road left of center. The photo on the right is from all the way up to the mine.  You can see a red dot far down the scree slope, that’s Gene climbing up from the road.

Once you get to the mine the fun begins. On the left Gene stands on a ledge of solid rock which he is drilling in preparation to blast. You can tell the second photo is the next week because he’s changed his shirt. The blasting is a delicate process actually, too much explosive and the rock is blown apart and the jasper shattered.

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The Lower Cliff Dig went directly into the base of a shear rock wall that went straight up above us for a hundred feet or so. The fact that I was willing to mine directly below it is evidence that I assumed that Gene knew what he was doing. Wherever he went I followed, simply putting my life in his hands and enjoying a great adventure. Thanks Gene, we made it!

Gene Mueller and Thom Lane digging in Owyhee Canyon.

The shear rock wall can be seen on the left. At the end of many days we had uncovered a vein of Morrisonite that was six feet long that yielded 600 pounds of high quality jasper. He set his camera on a rock and took this photo of us sitting at each end of the vein. He had mined it with such care that at this moment the vein was exposed but still unbroken.

1996 This year I brought a good tent

Jake joined us for this month of mining. He has been prospecting for and mining gem agates and jaspers his whole life and is also a very artistic cabochon cutter. On top of that he is one of the smartest and most considerate men I’ve known. In spite of having a hard youth and only a sixth grade education he is looked up to by everyone who knows him, Gene Mueller and Hans Gamma are close friends of his.

We had a village of 3, truly remote. Gene’s  cabin is behind a huge boulder just beyond Jake’s white ten which you will see below. I pitched my tent far off the right, I guess I couldn’t stand the crowd.

 

Jake’s tent was the most livable of our three camps with a comfy cot and a stove. When I got up in the morning I’d wander in front of his tent and eventually he would call out “Hey Thom, want a cup of bean? The best coffee I ever had.

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Here is the man himself in front of his camp that the early Native Americans would have appreciated. He spent more days living like this than under a house roof, almost always by himself, mining and prospecting.

When I arrived the Lower Cliff Dig it had just been blasted and I spent the month mining there. Eventually it was drilled and shot a second time by Jake and he spent some days up with me showing me the proper way to work it. I took these photos then.

On the left Jake had just found a piece of black Morrisonite with lovely orbs, he looks happy! In the center balanced on a rock face is Jake at work. I never saw him rush and I never saw him stumble and he spotted a lot more Morrisonite than I ever did. If nothing else that summer I was the most fit I’ve ever been.

During the time I mined at the Lower Cliff Dig I was mostly working alone except for the happy visits from Jake. Gene was mining the whole time for Christine Marie jasper and produced many great pieces of the highest quality.

Bright moments!